18 posts tagged "boring tech"

Jumping to Random Posts

The attentive among you might have noticed a new “Random” link at the bottom of each post in this blog, taking you to a (you guessed it) random post on this blog, powered by the RANDOM() function of SQLite (because, you do remember that the search feature in this blog is built on top of SQLite, do you?

Revisiting Ruby on Rails

I’ve blogged about Ruby on Rails quite a few times in the past 18 years. I’ve delivered lots of Rails apps, I’ve used it for my own company, and I have been a historic fan of Rails against all odds and against all opinions.

On Documentation

In my career I’ve seen lots of teams struggling, not only to get their software out of the door, but much more often (even if successful in the previous step) to have a decent level of documentation next to it.

Conway in Minimal BASIC

Last Monday I released the 59th issue of De Programmatica Ipsum, my dear monthly magazine about code, developers, and society, and this month I talked about BASIC in all of its flavors. As part of the preparation of this issue, I dived into the world of Minimal BASIC code, the one with source code line numbers, the one that would start immediately after powering up your computer, and the one that brings endless nostalgia.

Back to Monoliths

So Amazon Prime Video (of all people!) published a blog post about how they’re returning to monoliths, relayed by DHH, generating lots of noise, to the point that even Dr. Werner Vogels himself, CTO at Amazon, had to pour some thoughts about the subject.

GaMMA

Digging in my archives I found a backup of my personal home page from 2000 to 2003, and through a little work of archeology and restoration, I made it work in our modern world of 2023.

Redmine

I was surprised to discover recently that good old Redmine not only still exists in 2022, but it thrives in various unexpected ways.

Bootstrap

I love Bootstrap. No matter which web frontend framework I try, I always end up returning to it.

Server Side Rendering FTW

I am, I have been, and forever will be a big advocate of server-side rendering. I think it is an essential way to build dynamic web content. I believe in this adamantly, feverishly, strongly, and relentlessly.

Stockholm Syndrome in Software

Developers working for a particular vendor tend to develop a bizarre version of Stockholm syndrome. It’s something I’ve witnessed at least twice in my career.

What Objective-C 3.0 Could Have Been

In a parallel universe, in a parallel WWDC 2014, instead of Swift, developers got Objective-C 3.0, and this is what it would have looked like. It’s the same parallel universe where Russia doesn’t annex Crimea, by the way.

The Languages That Bend Your Mind

Many programming languages have been sold to unsuspecting software developers with enticing descriptions, promising “transformative experiences” that “irrevocably alter their way of thinking” and other ethereal descriptions, seemingly belonging to other categories of products, such as yoga classes, religions, drugs, progressive rock albums, or role playing games.

D, or What Go May Have Been

In my quest to learn more and more programming languages, I recently dipped my toes into the D Programming Language. My reaction to it involves sadness; on the positive side of things, the language is undeniably brilliant.

Crystal is a Surprise

I blogged about Dart a few weeks ago, and I said it was refreshingly boring. I am probably late to the party, but I discovered Crystal recently, and it is not only boring but also surprising in many delicious ways.

Dart is Boring

Lately, I’ve been playing with Dart, the programming language powering the cross-platform Flutter UI framework. I’ve added a Dart implementation to my collection of (now 21) programming languages in the Conway project, and another to the collection of sample Fortune web APIs.

Visual J++

Once upon a time, there was a programming environment made by Microsoft called Visual J++.

Hay un Lenguaje llamado COBOL

Soy un escritor. Reivindico mi pertenencia a un subconjunto de la raza humana que escribe.

Preferred Programming Languages

There are basically 5 languages that I really like. For several reasons.